Available Now!!

Both Foxtrot Uniform: 004 and Luke Scarisbrick’s debut pamphlet, I Bought a Skull called Francis, are now available to order from our website.

Foxtrot Uniform: 004 is a poetry magazine for our troubled times. Full of hope, darkness, and creativity FU spans several continents bringing us all together using fresh words. You can buy 004 for £3.00 (plus postage if living outside the UK).

I Bought a Skull Called Francis – an idle year in ten movements is the debut pamphlet by Luke Scarisbrick. The pamphlet charts a year in the life by mixing poetry with polaroid pictures.
The poetry is surreal and straight-up hilarious, but it is also tinged with darkness, which the polaroid pictures both exacerbate and illuminate. You can buy I Bought a Skull Called Francis for the amazing price of £2.50 (plus postage if living outside the UK).

To order a copy simply send the correct money along with your postal address to https://paypal.me/FoxtrotUniform?locale.x=en_GB then we will get your order in the post.

Please help spread the word so that we can share these amazing words even further and wider!

Reece’s Pieces: My Relationship with Surrealism

Words by Reece David Merrifield; acknowledgments to David Morris’ ‘The Lives of the Surrealists’

When I had to come up with a research topic in my second year, it was only ever going to be related to surréalisme. I embarked on an ‘art translation’ project inspired by Brauner, Tanguy, Miró, Magritte etc etc etc., and the week itself, all alone on the hottest week in July, only added a surreal edge to proceedings. This piece however, is not a reflection on that time, but why I reserve such interest in Surrealism.

            For me, it is the adult’s excuse not only to escape reality, but also to question it too. Why must a watch never droop? Why can’t a businessman have an apple for a face? These are probably the most famous examples, but the point still stands. We need these points, not a forward-straight path of reality, to enjoy ourselves. Surrealism embodies a resistance to established norms in flamboyant fashion. It isn’t (or at least I don’t think it should be) violent or dismissive, but playful and emotive. Max Ernst put it succinctly when he said ‘I believe the best thing to do is to have one eye closed and to look inside, and this is the inner eye. With the other eye, you have it fixed on reality, what is going on around the world’. You must observe your surroundings, but not let it fully dictate your relationship with it too. Surrealism to me is ironically a constant act of balance, a businessman on a tightrope.

            I enjoy incorporating surrealistic elements into my own work (and usually persist even if others don’t understand). I also enjoy work that, although not directly related to the movement, contains surrealistic tendencies, like Magic Realism or (up for debate) science fiction. It is away from what I already know or am expected to know and is subsequently all the more interesting because of it.

            In preparation of this article I have been reading Desmond Morris’ ‘The Lives of the Surrealists’. I am in equal measures astonished and fascinated finding out about the characters beyond their paintings and writings. Dalí is a well-documented case: not only did he fantasise about Hitler, he also supported Franco’s reign in Spain, only to flip-flop between these beliefs when the Second World War was beginning and, after Franco’s death, ‘transferred his allegiance to the Spanish royal family’. He also carried the largest ego within the movement, and after a while a person like that can become, in my mind, over-indulgent and sickly. It was also a shock to find that Breton, the proclaimed founder of the movement, was misogynistic and homophobic, and was often seen by the inner circle of Surrealists as dictatorial (and to their credit a lot of them brought up this point, only to be expelled or angrily dismissed). It is difficult to accept that these people held such beliefs or actions, but they must be put aside as individual characteristics, and allow Surrealism as an ideal to prevail. I relate much more to Miró, a ‘figure […] of small stature and immaculately dressed in an a quietly elegant suit’. He seemed, as Morris supposed, someone who put so much into their work that that was enough creativity without further causing or spilling havoc around him. If there were to be a neo-surrealistic movement, it would need its celebrities, but also many more Mirós.

            I think that I will always hold Surrealism in high regard and defend it to the hilt. I enjoy the inhibition it allows, the games you can play, the vividness it creates. On my travels, coming upon art galleries, I always hope to find art that is surreal, regardless of its owner’s artistic motivation or association. Long may that continue.

003 Coming Soon!

003 is now complete! Here is a list of all the accepted poems, prose, and Art. If you have been accepted please ensure we have your address so a free copy of the magazine can be sent to you. If you would like to pre-order a copy of Foxtrot Uniform: 003 please email: foxtrotuniformpoetry@gmail. Copies cost £3

Our Cover Artist for 003 is Steph Coathupe if you’d like to see more of her work it can be accessed on her website: www.stephcoathupe.com

Poetry

Livermore, Richard

‘Renegade Frog’

Ehrlich, Milton
‘The Tightrope of the Mind’
‘Tender Moments’

Royle, Holly
‘Defying The Path’

Meade, Gordon
‘Asian Elephant’
‘Sea Lion’

Khomutoff, Rus
‘Sonic threshold of the sacred’
‘A collaboration between Khomutoff & Soriano’

Scarisbrick, Luke
‘Facebook Zuckbook Face Fuckface Bookface Book’

Connolly, Paul
‘Haircuts’
‘Burn it all’

Reynard-Bowness, Billy
“’owt else pales when compared t’ th’ Dales”

Potts, Laura
‘The Night That Robin Died’

Miles, Ezra
‘Not to be reproduced’
‘The Circus’

Meakin, Michael
‘Extinction’

Fahey, Paul
‘A display of Artistic Temprament’
‘Dog on a String’

Carber, Len
‘Ode To Mrs Miller’
‘Near the Orchard’

Brown, Elle
‘Daisy’
‘Elm Seeds’

Haley, David
‘Planning Prospects’

Cialis, Joshua
‘Now (A poem for Margate)

Merrifield, Reece
‘Cigarettes’
‘StyrsÖ

Prose

Cialis, Joshua
‘On Spontaneity’

Art by

Erlick, Joshua

Kuznetsova, Olesya

Jones, Stuart

Hayward, Matthew
‘Collaborator’

Publishing opportunity

This is just a reminder that if you would like to be considered for publication in the next issue of Foxtrot Uniform, you need to send us an email with some work. We are accepting poetry, prose and art.

We are looking for new and exciting ideas, forms and images for publication in our upcoming print magazine. We want to see your work!!

If you’d like your creativity published send it to us in the next 3 weeks. The email address is foxtrotuniformpoetry@gmail.com

A Reflection on Hannah Gadsby’s ‘Nanette’

I stumbled across this stand-up comedy show scrolling through the digital wilderness at that point in the evening where anything will suffice to get you through to an acceptable bedtime hour. Hannah Gadsby is an Australian comedian who has been on the circuit for around 10 years or so, but in this show she explains that the circuit has only taken her around on a vicious cycle, and explains it is not enough for her to be just ‘funny’ anymore.

She starts off, however, in normal fashion (although she would pertain her fashion is ‘not so normal’). Very dry, thorough and to the point with her humour: she does her job in almost scientific terms, dissecting her jokes and timing their ‘two-points’ of tension and relief with the utmost precision (and she knows this as well). One joke in particular underpins the show as its fundamental core: the message that, as the show reaches its powerful and penetrating climax, made comedy take a step back and really assess what its purpose in the world should be.

Two women are at a bust-stop: herself and another, just chatting away (‘maybe having a little flirt, who knows?), before a man, who we very soon find out to be the other’s girlfriend, shouts out ‘oy you faggot!’. The man in question then clocks that she is not a man but, indeed, a woman, and retracts his statement to say that ‘I thought you were a man hitting on my girl, and in any case I don’t hit women’. Cue the ironic ‘what a guy’ from Hannah, the classic build-up of tension and swift removal to make everyone room at ease, the reason why most came to stand-up in the first place. However, as she goes on to explain, this ‘joke’ has been on too long a hiatus, and needed to be developed into a more conventional ‘beginning-middle-end’ story, delivering a fatal blow to the punchline.

The man realised that actually, she was a ‘faggot’, and proceeded to beat her to within an inch of her life, leaving her on the street in tatters. Yet she would not go to the hospital, or call the police, or ask for help, because as a marginalised individual in this world she has felt as if help did not belong to her, that she did not deserve it. This ending is not funny, it is not joke, but for ten years she had made it so, because it is what the business requires: humour, not honesty. And kudos to her for shattering the illusion, as we reach this point in time where even the rosiest of entertainments cannot hide from the cruelty of our society, where you see comedians like her all over using self-deprecation as a means to something better, but not the end.

Finally, I want to reflect upon her discussion of Picasso, the patriarchal strings that have pulled him up tight and paraded him around as a hero, and how it made me a feel. She was very visceral in her criticism of white, heterosexual males (of which I’m part of) and I must admit, it did stick in quite deep. She highlighted his philandering, abusive conquests, including that of an underage girl, and the deep misogyny rooted in him she labelled as a mental illness (and so it should be). But she highlighted (unintentionally to me of course but to the ‘group’ I belong to) the prejudice that is also deeply rooted even in my psyche. She mentioned Woody Allen in a list of truly evil men who are still celebrated for their work and the argument that you should ‘split the artist from his work’. Now Woody Allen’s comedy to me has always been truly tremendous, both his prose and his films. And (now I know, naively s) I have defended that ‘one and the other’ argument precisely because of that. But her message, that we live in a rigged system of men in my mould who are only now receiving dents of criticism, put me to shame, and rightly so. I still have a lot to learn, and performances like hers will soon open up those dents so that we can configure society in a completely new way.

Send us your Work

Hello Reader,

Did you know that we are open for submissions of poetry, prose and art. If selected your work will be published in 003 of Foxtrot Uniform. We want to see your new poems, short stories, essays, collages, sketches, or anything else you might’ve done. Foxtrot Uniform is a free space to express yourself. Our magazine is your magazine.

We already have some amazing submissions but we think there’s more to see! If you would like to have your work published, email foxtrotuniformpoetry@gmail.com and attach up to 5 pieces in a word document, along with your name and address. Every person that is published will receive a free copy of the magazine and their work will be immortalised in print alongside some other great creatives.

So what do we like to see?

Foxtrot Uniform is a free space for creatives to share their work. We like to see the unseen, the form bending, the formless, the political, the surreal, the beautiful, and the ugly; if your work is different and new we will probably like it…

So what are you waiting for, email us some poetry, prose, or art…

 

Foxtrot Uniform: 002

The magazine is at the printers and will be published and sent out on 17th May. Anyone who has pre-ordered a copy should receive their copy by the 19th.

If you would like to pre-order a copy the price is £2 and all you have to do is email us; we will then send you a secure link for payment. Postage is free for UK residents. However, overseas postage will have to be sent alongside the original price. seeing that we believe everyone should have the opportunity to access great writing, we have tried to keep the price down as much as possible for the sake of accessibility. Your £2 covers printing costs and postage.

We hope you will enjoy the issue and keep ordering copies…

A look Inside 002

Hello poetry readers! This post is devoted to 002 of Foxtrot Uniform, we’ll unveil the cover art and show you the poetry, prose, and art being published in 002.

First things first, we’ve been working with a great young artist for our cover of 002. The art is a woodblock print produced and created by Isabel Duffy. You can see some of her other works on Instagram @isabelva.art.

To pre-order a copy of the magazine email us…

Ok so here’s the list you’ve all been waiting for, the list of published works:

Poetry

Blu Maximo, ‘Artists’
Daniel de Culla, ‘Snorting Poetry’
DS. Maolalai, ‘The Girl in the Café’
DS. Maolalai, ‘The Trouble Publishing Poems’
Eduard Schmidt-Zorner, ‘Abandonment’
Eduard Schmidt-Zorner, ‘Mayakovskay Metro Station’
Gareth Hughes, ‘Marlon Brando’
Gareth Hughes, ‘The Moth’
Gilsenan, ‘Sixth Time Around’
Grace Rennison, ‘Beauty according to Byron’
Grant Tabard, ‘Soft Underbelly’
Grant Tabard, ‘To Be Cohabitants’
Holly Royle, ‘Our Species Greed’
Holly Royle, ‘The Unknown’
Jack Houston, ‘The not sure and the why’
Joshua Cialis, ‘Midnight in Suburbia’
Joshua Cialis, ‘Underpass of exit 3, Westminster Station’
Len Carber, ‘The Old Tracks’
Luke Scarisbrick, ‘Ian didn’t like my Rock Song’
Luke Scarisbrick, ‘Records for Liam’
Michelle Parkinson, ‘Bildungsroman’
Omar Ferro, ‘Are You Present’
Paul Fahey, ‘1313 Virgil Tracey Towers’
Poppy Harris, ‘We Sat on the Beach Listening’
Reece Merrifield, ‘2/3’
Reece Merrifield, ‘Compromise’
Rehan Qayoom: ‘A Poem of Maturity’
Sean McDonagh, ‘Notes from a Dream Sequence’
Sean McDonagh, ‘Sun’
Yohann Okyemba Ngassaki, ‘Cheat’
Gregory Santo Arena, ‘Hallo my little militant’
Gregory Santo Arena ‘I cry in bed at night’

Prose

Edward Little, ‘Mount Haku’
Rosie Saxon, ‘The Lady on the Roof’
Rosie Saxon, ‘The Noise in the Night’

Art

Daniel de Culla, Collage
Matthew Kay, ‘Beyond this Place’
Matthew Kay, ‘On Thursday’
Peter Campbell Saunders, ‘Café’
Peter Campbell Saunders, ‘In the Snug’
Ruhi Cialis, ‘Danger’

002

Submissions for 002 have now closed. We are enjoying reading through your poetry and prose and looking at your art.

We are currently putting the magazine together, we have a cover artist, most of our poems have been chosen, and we’re getting excited!

If you’re as excited as us, pre-order a copy by emailing us…

Due to an increase in printing costs this issue will be on offer as a print magazine for £2 (plus non-UK postage). This price is to keep the magazine accessible to everyone.

To pre-order a copy email: foxtrotuniformpoetry@gmail.com